Tag Archives: penmanship

write.create.connect.

Practice makes perfect, right? At least that’s what we tell our children. But when it comes to handwriting, I’d prefer not to aim for perfection but rather along the lines of consistency and fluidity. After a marathon Holiday-card-writing session or sending out Thank You’s post-celebration, I invariably find my handwriting feels and looks better. And why shouldn’t it? It’s just the same as practicing the piano, playing tennis, or even reading a book. The more we engage, the more time we give towards an activity, the stronger we become. So why not find more enjoyment in your handwriting plus learn a few new tips in expressing your personality through letter writing? I have found your perfect solution…

Brown Ink Paper Goods has collaborated with Foxglove Market & Studio and Gina Sekelsky Studio to create Handwritten, a workshop series stemming from a joint passion for the handwritten word and artisan paper goods. The class will provide an opportunity to renew one’s self confidence in your personal writing, teach new tricks for disguising imperfections, and help bring out a bit of charm and charisma to handwritten cards and letters.

Handwritten

 Your fingers will be ecstatic to take a needed break from the keyboard or smartphone, learn something new, and return to what they were intended to be used for…handwriting.  Be sure to sign up here soon before the spots are filled by other eager fingers!

The Moment

Last week I received a package from a dear friend, Tracy, who lives in California. She was my old boss but, more importantly, a trusted and loving confidante whom I wish I connected with more often. Tracy is old-school in the sense she never texts, rarely emails, but occasionally rings while sipping wine in a vineyard she thinks we ought to visit. The moment I noticed Tracy’s easily identifiable handwriting on a brown paper package on my doorstep, I smiled really, really big.

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I had seen her writing for years on production shoot notes or editing scripts, each letter always leaning way to the left as if there was a fan on the right side of the page. This was Tracy alright. Although her writing made me miss my close friend, there was a comfort in knowing she had created this package and card only days ago, pen and paper in hand. Nothing better.

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I thought of this feeling again today when I received a correspondence in the mail. Just a few days ago I met up with a woman named Michelle, a fellow believer in the importance of handwriting . While we both took notes during our conversation I noticed her unique penmanship. All of her letters were printed lowercase yet still held a nice finesse and sophistication. When I found her letter sticking out of the junk mail one day, I knew in a second this was Michelle (I soon enjoyed a thoughtful note on lovely cotton paper, personalized with letterpress. My kind of girl!). Even after one meeting, her writing became one of the pieces of my new friend.

As we consume piles of catalogues, bills and excess paper advertisements each day, it’s a simple joy to receive anything personal in the mail these days. It’s in this moment when holding a simple, handwritten letter naturally forces me to pause, feel the life within the correspondence, and appreciate and give thanks for the effort behind the letter.